J Class Submarines

The J-Series Submarines saw service in Great Britain, where they were built during 1915/1916 in an attempt to outrun German U-Boats rumoured to be under construction that were capable of 24 knots. The J-Series couldn?t achieve this speed ? though the achieved a respectable 19 knots.

Each of the J-series have a unique bow ring and modifications after construction. It is worth diving them all to compare their hull modifications, the rings, and their internal configuration.

With an interesting WW I history ? they saw significant service. They were eventually given as a gift from the British Royal Navy to the Australian Navy in 1919. There were also some interesting peace time incidents, including collisions and an accidental sinking!

Due to their extensive service during the War, when they arrived ? the submarines required expensive ongoing maintenance that the Australian Navy simply could not keep up ? and after extensive analysis and investigation into means of keeping them afloat, all were eventually stripped then scuttled, in 1926

Dive Locations in J Class Submarines

J 7 Sub

The J7 is the newer of the submarines ? built to replace the stricken J6 ? and completed in 1918. As such it arrived in Australia in much better condition. It now resides at the Sandringham Yacht Club, but it needs a special ?permit? to dive (it can however be seen from above the surface … Continue reading J 7 Sub

29/01/2015 07:19 hrs
by
trimixguy

J 6 Sub

The J6 was sunk in 1917 by ?friendly? British Fire ? accidentally – and as such did not form part of the original British gift flotilla. It does not reside in Port Phillip.

29/01/2015 07:19 hrs
by
trimixguy

J 5 Sub

The ?Yellow submarine? offers a challenging penetration dive, with more of the fittings intact, and bulk heads separating each chamber. Penetration is limited Wreck Certified divers. Outside, the wreck provides an interesting swim through under the rudder, and the sub rests in the sand on the spindle where the drive shaft used to reside at … Continue reading J 5 Sub

29/01/2015 07:19 hrs
by
trimixguy

J 4 Sub

The J4 lies between 26-30 m, and is broken open near the bow, exposing its torpedo tubes, and allowing relatively unimpeded penetration of the rest of the wreck. Stripped inside ? it provides a long cylindrical passage for an easy penetration, and generally can be penetrated by unqualified divers in appropriate conditions. The stern section … Continue reading J 4 Sub

29/01/2015 07:19 hrs
by
trimixguy

J 3 Sub

The Swan Island Sub sits close to the shore of Swan Island – an ASIO research facility ? and the island itself has expected restrictions to access. The sub lies in 6 m of water and can be snorkelled, or dived as a relaxing shallow dive. No opportunity for penetration exists. There are a large … Continue reading J 3 Sub

29/01/2015 07:18 hrs
by
trimixguy

J 2 Sub

The J2 was also quite successful during WW I ? coming across an unprepared enemy boat, and attacking. Broken during scuttling by explosive charges ? the wreck now lies at between 38 and 39m, and can be penetrated, but jagged metal is an issue. The wreck is quite tilted, lying at an angle of about … Continue reading J 2 Sub

29/01/2015 07:18 hrs
by
trimixguy

J 1 Sub

The J1 has a unique place in history as the only submarine to hit two enemy ships with a single salvo of torpedoes. With her hull intact ? the J1 one provides a challenging penetration dive for those with appropriate qualifications (CDAA or Wreck Diver). Listing slightly to port, it provides a swim through UNDER … Continue reading J 1 Sub

29/01/2015 07:18 hrs
by
trimixguy

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